In retrospect – 3 lessons learned on being an Entrepreneur

“Being an entrepreneur is living a meaningful and adventurous life; it requires courage, commitment, and curiosity to learn” Hadas

It has been six months since I created this definition for myself. Many things happened that mixed work and personal life, I had to develop new skills and face new and sometimes uncomfortable realities. In retrospect, it’s definitely shaping to be one of the most interesting adventures I have taken in my career. Here are my top 3 takeaways

Focus

Most of us live a very busy and demanding life: wake up, go to work, deal with the politics, get paid, manage our personal life, go to sleep, wake up and start again. How much of that is really to do with your passion, with your purpose?. I thought I was making the most out of it, and then I got out of the formal job world for a bit and I discovered the power of being single-minded. Focus on one thing.

I spend my days only on the things that matter to me with no purposeless meetings, no meaningless PowerPoints, only work that has value. Being focus enables everything you do to be part of your purpose. This is regardless of whether you are investing your energy with a family member, helping a colleague or developing a product.

I am realistic that my work context may change, but the experience made it very clear to me that focusing only on the things that matter has to be my way of working from now.

Learning and reflection time

I remember a conversation a few years ago with a frustrated executive. Employee engagement results came back and one of the top areas of concerns for the employees was learning and development. It made no sense. The organisation had a sizable training budget and fast-changing work requirements meant people had lots of opportunities to learn something new. True. What people didn’t have was the time for retrospects and no time to embed new knowledge into useful skills before rushed to the next thing. Hence, no real learning and development.

In the last six months, I really got it. There are many hours where I am busy doing something (usually new), researching a new topic or meeting someone. But it is the ability to have the time in between, doing something different that allows for new insights to surface and new learning to become useful.

Grit 

By (my) definition as an Entrepreneur, you innovate to disrupt.  This means that in many cases people might intellectually engage with the need for your product but not for them as they don’t really want to be changed. When you are on your own or part of a small team, this can be daunting.

Grit is one of the qualities we will need more and more in the future. I, for example, am taking one pill of grit a day.  It contains the following ingredients: a reminder of the purpose and why I do what I do, a conviction that this is really going to make a positive difference in the world and a sprinkle of fun. 🙂

“If you want to change the world, start with yourself.” Mahatma Gandhi

 

 

@Hadas Wittenberg is a future of work enabler and founder of Adaptive-Futures.

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